Concept Design

CONCEPT DESIGN PROCESS

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RESOURCES:

AUTOMOTIVE: What is Design?
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN: The Art of Engineering
AUTMOTIVE: BMW Car Design Process
ANIMATION: Making of Star Wars Prequel Trilogy
ANIMATION: You Can Shine, No Matter What You're Made Of

  



      DESIGN OBJECTIVE

      First write a brief design objective including details.  The design or concept should be ORIGINAL.

      RESOURCES:

      Extra                              

      Design Objective:  I will design simple ‘steam-punk’ robotic character. 

      Objective Descriptors: Fun, charismatic, 1950s Sci-Fi, insects-ish, samurai, med-evil armor, steam-punk, industrial, toys, illustrative/cartoon, hero, modern, etc. 



      Initial Background Story
      Write an initial concept overview / backstory.  This could be elaborate or vague.  This will help you in developing your design and the more details you have now . 
             

      Example description of Coyote Tango from Pacific Rim:

      Coyote Tango is designed to resemble naval warships and Cobra attack helicopters in both color scheme and appearance. Coyote Tango's light armor allows it to perform various deadly maneuvers and has great speed to evade Kaiju attacks. It is also armed with twin long-range ballistic mortar cannons to damage Kaiju from afar; these were supplemented by a forearm-mounted, retractable V-PI EnergyCaster with five modes of modulation - this weapon in particular being considered highly experimental at the time of the Jaeger's launch.  Coyote Tango is also tied with Cherno Alpha for the tallest height on a Mark-1 Jaeger.

      As a Mark-1 Jaeger, Coyote Tango runs on the power of a nuclear reactor. Given the short amount of time the Pan Pacific Defense Corps had to build the first series of Jaegers in response to the Kaiju threat, none of the Mark-1 series Jaegers were reinforced with protective measures to prevent radiation poisoning. Consequently, the Rangers piloting Mark-1's were at an increased risk of contracting cancer-related illnesses from exposure. Both Tamsin Sevier and Stacker Pentecost developed cancer as a result of the Jaeger's poor radiation shielding and were retired from active duty.



      INSPIRATION BOARD
      You need to get inspired!  This is one of my favorite stages.   Basically you explore what is out there and possible directions you can go.  Collect /research reference images, current designs, inspirational, blueprints etc. Basically find as many as you need, which is at least 20+ sources.  I call this phase, the Inspiration Board”.  I have found that the best way to do this is to create a Padlet with all your resources.  This is not only a dynamic collection of resources, but it also retains the source information for later documentation.  



      THUMBNAIL SKETCHING

      Thumbnail sketches are a simple and quick way to get thinking, start planning your shot and help solve problems early on. Sketching can really help you to be inspired and get creative. Even if you don't draw well, crude thumbnail sketches can help you plan your poses and timing. The extra time spent on planning your work will be worth it in the long run. You wouldn't build a house without architect's plans, would you?

      Watch this video on thumbnail sketching with Von Glitschka: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zV4Pn-wr4oE  &  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bc6jsfdrf4M

      Create at least 2+ pages of well developed thumbnail sketches.  Here are some thumbnail examples, some are more elaborate than others.   Don’t be intimidated by the examples, these are just supposed to be light sketches.  Play with design implementing the 'Elements of Art', line, shape, form, space, color, and texture.  Each sketch should be quick and no longer than a minute or two.  You are just visually exploring directions.

      Optional videos on thumbnail sketching:

      Character thumbnails silhouettes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLHKJS1k4u8

      Thumbnails2 
      robot-sketch-robots



      DEVELOPMENT SKETCHES

      Choose three of your best or favorite thumbnails and further explore these designs.  Basically, these sketches are more detailed version of your best thumbnail designs with thoughtful annotations. Create at least 3 pages of development sketches. You should have at least 1 page for each design direction.  Here are some thumbnail examples, some are more elaborate than others.   Don’t be intimidated by these examples, these are from professionals or post-secondary students.

      Development Direction #1

      Development Direction #2
      mayu-kawakami-robot-concept-sketch-grey
      Development Direction #3
      Develop

      FINAL OVERVIEW & BACKSTORY

      Write a complete concept overview.

              

      Example description of Coyote Tango from Pacific Rim:

      Coyote Tango is designed to resemble naval warships and Cobra attack helicopters in both color scheme and appearance. Coyote Tango's light armor allows it to perform various deadly maneuvers and has great speed to evade Kaiju attacks. It is also armed with twin long-range ballistic mortar cannons to damage Kaiju from afar; these were supplemented by a forearm-mounted, retractable V-PI EnergyCaster with five modes of modulation - this weapon in particular being considered highly experimental at the time of the Jaeger's launch.  Coyote Tango is also tied with Cherno Alpha for the tallest height on a Mark-1 Jaeger. 
       
      As a Mark-1 Jaeger, Coyote Tango runs on the power of a nuclear reactor. Given the short amount of time the Pan Pacific Defense Corps had to build the first series of Jaegers in response to the Kaiju threat, none of the Mark-1 series Jaegers were reinforced with protective measures to prevent radiation poisoning. Consequently, the Rangers piloting Mark-1's were at an increased risk of contracting cancer-related illnesses from exposure. Both Tamsin Sevier and Stacker Pentecost developed cancer as a result of the Jaeger's poor radiation shielding and were retired from active duty.


      DRAFT CONCEPT DESIGN
      Choose one of your best or favorite development sketches and take it to the next level.  Refine and further develop the details of your design.  Fully annotate your designs. 
      Here are three examples of final concept design drafts.

      Round2

      FINAL CONCEPT DESIGN
      Notes:

      f7c0bda9fb5653e6f2bd4dfd277b0a0b_original


      EVALUATION

      0-65
      66 – 89
      90 – 100
      BONUS (0 – 20)
      Initial Interest Direction
      Minimal Resources
      -5 Images
      Some Resources
      6 – 17 Images
      Fully Explored &
      18 - 20+ Images
      Design Objective & Descriptors            
      Poorly Written
      Some Development and Details
      Fully Developed and Detailed
      Good: grammar, punctuation, & complete sentences
      Initial Concept Overview – Backstory
      Poorly Written
      Some Development – Completed
      Well Developed, Detailed Overview
      Good: grammar, punctuation, & complete sentences
      Inspiration Board
      Minimal Resources
      -5 Images
      Some Resources
      & Relevant
      6 – 17 Images
      Fully Explored
      & Relevant
      18+ Images
      Thumbnail Sketching
      Minimally explored Concepts Direction
      0 - 1 Page of 
      0 –1 Thumbnails
      Some Explored 
      Concepts Direction
      1 - 2+ Pages of
      10 - 20
      Thumbnails
      Fully Explored 
      Concepts Direction
      3-4+ Pages of
      20 - 30+ Thumbnails  
      Above and Beyond
      Development Sketches
      Minimal Development -
      Unfinished
      Some Development – Finished
      Fully Developed, Detailed & Annotated
      Above and Beyond
      Concept Overview – Backstory            
      Poorly Written
      Some Development – Completed
      Well Developed, Detailed Overview
      Good: grammar, punctuation, & complete sentences
      Above and Beyond
      Final Concept Design
      Minimal Development -
      Unfinished
      Some Development – Finished
      Fully Developed, Detailed & Annotated
      No Eraser Marks
      Straight clean lines
      Above and Beyond

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